Saturday, December 8, 2012

Gov't ads: Public information or disinformation?

The Plan:
The Tyee, Andrew MacLeod, November 16, 2011
"The British Columbia government is preparing to spend "lots" of money to advertise Premier Christy Clark's jobs strategy, Jobs, Tourism and Innovation Minister Pat Bell said today.

"...The bulk of the campaign will be international, but also with some advertising within B.C., said Bell..."
The Claim:
BC Jobs Plan advertising

The Reality, from Statistics Canada:



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3 comments:

  1. There may be many jobs coming to BC, eventually. The jobs just won't be for, the BC people.

    Campbell gave BC's resources to China, long ago. In Campbell's time. China was to send their people to school, to learn 100 English words, to take BC mining jobs. No BC people can apply for those jobs. They must speak Chinese Mandarin, to work in their own, English speaking province.

    Harper has sold Canada out to Communist China. Harper is merely a mouthpiece for China's dictatorship rule. Harper said in his omnibus bill. China can sue any Canadians in any form, that block's China's intrusion into Canada.

    Any resource provinces that have a lick of sense, would get the hell out of, Harper's so called Canada. However, they won't. We will all sit and be taken over. BC has been pretty much gone, since Campbell's time. Resources, jobs and all.

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  2. Martyn Brown, writing in the Vancouver Sun, tries to shame the BC Liberals about their $15-million political propaganda campaign. Brown, more than anyone, should know the BC Liberals are beyond shame.

    Speaking of faulty memory: Matt Taibbi has rolled out another great piece in Rolling Stone - Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan Apparently Can't Remember Anything.

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  3. I'd be one to admit no memory is perfect, details getting blurred over time; it's natural. Still, it's amazing what one does remember, especially those little details that seem to retain their freshness due to, I suppose, their prescience. Like Gordon Campbell grinning like a shit eating hound as leader Adrienne Carr was introduced to the televised leader's debate, the first for the Green Party, because he knew if Ms Carr was to be rewarded by this higher profile, it would be at the expense of the NDP. Although NDP leader Carole James' arguments were clear and reasonable, her defences deft and the result remarkable (the NDP improved its seat count by ten fold in that election), no pundit failed to calculate that if even half the Green vote had gone NDP instead, James' success would have been even bigger, maybe even enough to beat the BC Liberals---a classic vote "split" as 't were. Now, the whole theory of vote splitting is a bit of a mug's game, especially its reputed analytical value both in retrospect and prognosis. Whenever I hear the term "vote-splitting," like when Christy warns of the BC Conservatives splitting the "free enterprise" vote, for example, I'm reminded of Campbell's grin...while I quickly calculate the sum of BC Liberal and BC Conservative polling numbers do not nearly equal, let alone exceed the NDP's; there might be some debate whether this split that, but not in this case.

    I vividly recall one detail so small it wasn't really there: silence. That's when the announcement of Christy's party leadership victory was followed by an brief but un-concealable moment of silence before a sprinkling of polite applause issued from the stunned audience. Every time I see the BC Liberals dutifully, if unenthusiastically try to show party solidarity (and failing more times than I can remember), I think of that exquisite moment of silence at the BC Liberal leadership convention. It illustrates so much about the party's post-Campbell demise no matter how much they try to paper it over at our expense.

    Some of these little tidbit details keep their lustre for a remarkably long time. Way back --gosh, I can't remember exactly when -- some sort of televised town hall-type venue, I think...anyway, present in the audience from which a moderator would invite comment, were Joy McPhail, then interim leader of the recently reduced NDP and Christy Clark, newly appointed, if memory serves me, to the new BC Liberal Cabinet. I recall only one detail but it still shines through the interceding years like Venus through twilight: At some point as Ms MaPhail was about to respond to a question, Christy Clark interrupted with the comment, "I don't think anyone believes anything you have to say, anyway," while a bevy of supporting shills in the surrounding seats sniggered and smirked at Christy's classroom stink-bomb. The comment was so rudely puerile, Ms McPhail, not known to be a shrinking violet, seemed gobsmacked, perhaps not wanting to dignify the snipe with a response. For some reason this little snippet stands out for me among the millions of other comments demonstrating crassness as one of the main ingredients of Christy's brand of hubris. Now, whenever I hear her incessant boosterism, so much of which can be refuted with a little grade school arithmetic, I am reminded of her comment all those years ago. Hopefully, when we boot her ass out of government in May, it'll have her own teeth marks on it. And whenever I see BC Liberals' partisan campaigning dressed up as public information we have to pay for, I think what a shame our money isn't being spent on things more desperately in need. No one believes anything they have to say, anyway.

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