Thursday, November 17, 2011

Central to the whole controversy

Courtesy Raeside Cartoons
Vaughn Palmer writes about Attorney General Shirley Bond's letter to Stephen Toope,
"Should the government require recovery of legal fees and disbursements paid for the defence of an indemnified employee who is then convicted or pleads guilty?" asked Bond. "If so, should the policy require government to seek recovery in all cases, without discretion?"

"The questions were central to the whole controversy..."
Huh? Central to the WHOLE controversy?

Not even close. In the BC Rail affair, $6-million dollars as an enticement for Basi and Virk to end the trial was only one of many weeping wounds on the body public. The real issue is that government conducted a fixed "sale" of a profitable public enterprise, one they promised, during an election campaign, would not be sold. To achieve this, Liberal sociopaths engaged in subterfuge and fraud and they allowed insiders like Patrick Kinsella to profit as drive-by looters and BC Rail executives to collect millions in hush money.

It amazes me that Palmer repeats fatuous bleats of a discredited government as if they are sincere and credible statements. For example,
"The government maintains that the Basi-Virk waiver was granted by then-deputy finance minister Graham Whitmarsh acting on advice from deputy attorney-general David Loukidelis. They acted in the belief that there was little chance of recovering more than a small portion of the $6 million in outlays."
But, leaving aside the truth about who authorized what, the government already held security on substantial real estate and other investments of Basi and Virk and this same government last year was suing hundreds of welfare recipients for overpayments, despite little chance of recovering more than small portions of the sums claimed.

Palmer's column shows his willingness to pull punches when he writes about this government. Everyone in Victoria knows that a deal was done to stop the trial before former Liberal Finance Minister Gary Collins got disassembled on the witness stand by defence lawyers who are among the best at the trade in western Canada. Liberals worried the barristers knew too much and would bring the government down.

Mr. Palmer, the questions central to the whole controversy are ones about the entire truth behind the disposition of BC Rail and its land bank. That involves much, much more than $6-milllion.

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12 comments:

  1. I shake my head when ever I hear Palmer being interviewed. When the issue he is on about is favourable to this government, he often uses the first person pronoun "we", but if the issue at hand has a negative bent, he uses the third person pronoun "they" when refering to this government.

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  2. Again you have nailed it Norman.

    V. Palmer continues to "report" on the fringes of horrendous political corruption, criminal theft and ongoing coverup. He still seems content to deflect and thereby minimize rather than focus on the heart of this enormous scandal.

    The Witmarsh white-wash is typical of Mr Palmer's ongoing light weight, kid glove handling of this story, too friendly to BC Liberal interests at the cost of the people of BC. His heavyweight reputation (by reach and past performance) is now very suspect. I do not mean to bemoan VP's character, however I find it very sad that he has fallen so far from his former reputation - his own doing by his own actions and inactions.

    Hopefully the Auditor General will get to the full truth of this historic scandal. There certainly has been much in the blogosphere to focus back to the core corruption.

    Thanks Norman.

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  3. Here is the real story about Palmer's lame reporting and Charlie Smith of the Georgia Straight hit the nail on the head.

    Some years ago, Charlie reported that Mr. Palmer was receiving handsome speaker fees on the guest speaker tour and these fees may reflect with his reporting. To harsh criticisms would lead to fewer speaking engagements.

    Bill Boring Palmer and the other flake ripped Charlie to shreds on this issue, but I think Charlie Smith hit a bullseye. If Palmer actually reported the truth about BC Rail as well as many more Liberal boondoggles, his guest speaking earnings would greatly diminish.

    I don't buy a Sun or Province and only glance at the headlines and I seldom if ever to NW as it has become a Liberal infomercial.

    A propagandist Palmer has become.

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  4. Norm everyone knows that Palmer, Baldry and Smyth are just mouthpeices for the government. Smyth puts on a little show every now and again, but he's no better than the rest of the herd. If any were to come out hard on this government they would be on the welfare line like so many others. Perhaps if that did happen they would be more sympathetic to the people of BC whose resources and assest are syphoned off by LIbERal insiders and money launders.

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  5. Palmer has not been relevant or worth reading or listening to ever since the preemy grabbed the bull's tail and is hanging on for dear life.

    Ditto for Bill Good and Keith Baldry.

    It isn't just everyone in Victoria that knows of the skullduggery with MacLain, Campbell and associates, the entire province knows and is seething about it.

    The real obstacle to rectification is that the rest of the country seems oblivious to the corporate fleecing of British Columbia. (epitomized by the BC Rail theft and Pony trial, with the aid of BC politicians, police, judiciary, media etc.)

    The only organ capable of turning the spotlight on the shenanigans in BC is the CBC, and perhaps Elizabeth May, but neither seems to grasp the gravity of the situation here or what it portends for the rest of the country and the future of democracy.

    Palmer is little more than a cartoon.

    Armed revolt is not out of the question.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Anon 8:19 AM "The only organ capable of turning the spotlight on the shenanigans in BC is the CBC..."

    OMG, you must be joking. Please. Don't for a moment be fooled by CBC.

    Like Smyth, they occasionally, belatedly, try to look like they're actually a credible news organization, but that's just when they feel the flames of public outrage flicking on the backs of their necks.

    I won't go into the numerous issues and incidents over the past several years that CBC has "treated" us to, particularly CBC - BC.

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  7. I should have said the 'national' spotlight.

    If not the CBC, then who?

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  8. I got sick of Palmer being a toady for the Campbell/Clark BC Liberals. After Palmer's first news line, I could finish the rest of his story. I canceled my news papers.

    Same as Michael Campbell and the rest of the sucks, on TV news hours. Same old crap, day after, dreary day. I have noticed, news on TV is repeated for the next days news. They run out of political news, because they are only permitted to praise, corrupt politicians and their governments.

    The media is, no guts, no glory and all crap.

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  9. Don't write off the CBC entirely. Their day to day news coverage may duplicate the others but if Fifth Estate were to take hold of this story (perhaps they already have), things would change. That program was brave enough to take on Brian Mulroney but then, it could be done from the comforts of that region laid out by lines drawn between Montreal, Ottawa and that big city by a lake.

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  10. Palmer says:"They acted in the belief that there was little chance of recovering more than a small portion of the $6 million in outlays.
    Still, for the sake of public appearances if nothing else, the government should have tried."

    Really Vaughn? Really? Are you f@#(*&%ing kidding? They acted in the belief that there is no way in hell Basi or Virk would have pled guilty and allowed the trial to end unless they waived the fees. That's why they acted. Everybody with an IQ higher than their age knows it, so why embarrass yourself with a dumb statement like that?

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  11. I suppose anyone unhappy with one of Palmer's columns could express thoughts by commenting at the Vancouver Sun website. No, can't do? Maybe they would publish a Letter to the Editor.

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  12. "I suppose anyone unhappy with one of Palmer's columns could express thoughts by commenting at the Vancouver Sun website. No, can't do? Maybe they would publish a Letter to the Editor."

    This is the equivalent of writing important messages in the sand as the tide is rising to erase them. The Sun very often closes comments on issues that might lead to harsh criticism of Gordo, Gordo in a Skirt Clark and the chance of them publishing a critical letter to the editor in the dead tree version is right up there with the Leafs winning the Stanley Cup, unless of course you cite Fraser Stinktank research in your letter........

    ReplyDelete

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