Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Vote strategically

A strong parliamentary opposition means better government. Minority governments do work.

Examine your home riding by inserting postal code at Project Democracy



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5 comments:

  1. I was, about to, cast a ballot for the NDP
    I wasn't going to vote for either of the two big spenders (while in government)

    If I was to vote NDP, I would let in Saxton (Conservative)

    If I vote for Noormohamed (Liberal), I'll be making sure that the Conservatives don't form a majority government.

    I guess that settles it!

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  2. I voted for Michael Charrois.Strategic voting is voting for either the white cats or the black cats.I will always vote for the party that represents my principles,not one that attacks democracy and human rights,and not one that talks a good talk during an election campaign and then proceeds to do exactly what Harper does,only with a smile on their face.Strategic voting assumes the liberals are a progressive party,which they most certainly are not.The NDP is on track to win at least 50 seats and strategic voting is nothing more than a ploy to keep the NDP "in it's place" which would serve the corporate establishment and their media sycophants just fine.

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  3. Good point Anonymous. I am in the same riding, facing the same choices.

    I don't find the Liberal Party of Canada holds attraction but I've found Andrew Saxton to be not engaged with the riding. He is not a small 'c' conservative, he is a large 'B' representative for Banking and Big Business.

    Noormohamed does have an admirable resume and personifies Canada's new ethnic and cultural reality. He's almost a kid from the neighborhood, having lived close to where I reside. However, the word Liberal makes me think of Chretien, Martin, Campbell and Clark.

    I'll probably decide to vote strategically against Saxton. Perhaps it is odd, but i don't mind the Conservative Party continuing in minority but I think they would be dangerous with a majority. They are already too much the party of business, not a party of people.

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  4. Union Will states well the issue that makes this a hard decision for electors. Additionally, if the NDP became the Official Opposition, it would allow the parties to realign more logically. Much of the Liberal Party and the Conservative Party belong together as right wing representatives of the elites. The middle block of fiscal and environmental moderates sharing a home with social progressives would provide a real opportunity of choice.

    Conservatives and Liberals are little more than Tweedledum and Tweedledee.

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  5. Many voters will be casting their vote to Dizzy May in my riding, choosing to vote strategically in an effort to oust Lunn. I simply cannot. Firstly, why support a party with no influence whatsoever in Ottawa? One MP amongst 308? Pfffttt. She will not be able to make any changes she is promising everyone here. Secondly, I see her as an opportunist having parachuted in here. When it is all over, my biggest wish is that she will return to the east coast where she belongs and quit watering down our votes. Third, she is a small 'c' conservative who happens to be green at heart. Why does she not just join a party already and try and save the world from there? It would be far more effective than to try and get a party going with more than 6 or 7% national support, or does she have 30 years?

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