Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Is Canada's legal system worthy of respect

If lawyers, courts or the Attorney General had regard for public education about their mystic world, they would emerge from warm sinecures to explain how our justice system works, if indeed it does work. Lay followers of the Basi/Virk trial were left with the taste of regurgitated detritus when the seven year long $20 million exercise ground to a halt that satisfied no person other than the ones who cashed cheques from bewildered taxpayers.

Basi/Virk though was simply one case among many that deplete public confidence in the justice system, a description that seems out of sync with reality. The ongoing gang wars that lead to shootings in the street and threats to innocents are even more outrageous. Consider this report by Sun Reporter Kim Bolan, one of Vancouver finest and bravest journalists:
. . . I was out at Surrey Provincial Court Monday for an afternoon hearing on an application for a ban on Jamie Bacon's sentencing hearing on his gun convictions, which continues Tuesday.

The Vancouver Sun and The Province are jointly challenging the ban application. But there remains a ban in place on everything that happened in court Monday, so I am unable to fill you in on the arguments of the various parties present.

However Judge Jean Lytwyn will provide a decision first thing Tuesday morning on at least one of the issues before her related to the ban.

Jamie Bacon's sentencing hearing is due to go until Friday. He was convicted in May 2010 on 10 guns charges related to a cache of weapons found in a secret compartment of a vehicle he used. The guns were found during a police investigation that followed a targeted shooting outside the Bacon's Surrey rental home back on April 13, 2007.
Considering ongoing events in Abbotsford, Canada's murder capital, why would the court conduct a post-conviction sentencing for this high profile criminal and prohibit publication of information revealed in court. Might authorities be bothered by public outrage over this continuing fetid ulcer. Do they aim to deal with it as quietly as possible?
Recommend this post

4 comments:

  1. As I have said on other blogs, other places, and to anyone who will listen, Canada does NOT have a "justice" system. We have a LAWYER system; wherein most, if not all, "judges" are, or were, lawyers.

    The LAWYER system works to employ, reward, and pay off LAWYERS, and a small number of the upper echelons of the political class who are not LAWYERS.

    The peasants (anyone not a lawyer, nor in the political class) do NOT benefit from the LAWYER system, but are required to pay for it through taxes, fees, and fines.

    ReplyDelete
  2. "If lawyers, courts or the Attorney General had regard for public education about their mystic world,"

    Ah, but that would require they have any regard at all for the public, which clearly is not the case.

    @terrence - bulls-eye

    ReplyDelete
  3. As long as the fruit is hanging low enough for the lawyers and judges to take it, they will. Doing the right thing never matters when you have a government that will look the other way and participate in favour exchanges.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Any lawyer I have known, has been corrupt. The judicial system is also corrupt. There is no government agency or service in BC, that isn't corrupt. Campbell's corrupt sale of the BCR trial, was such a farce, it was laughable. Campbell's corrupt sale, was tried in a corrupt court, presided over by a corrupt judge. And, brain dead witnesses, provided the loudest laughter of all. Did anyone hear, if Martyn Brown remembered his way home? Mind you, he did have selected memory, he just couldn't remember, any part Campbell played, in his corrupt sale of the BCR. He couldn't remember, that Basi and Virk, were told. If they kept their mouths shut, they would be taken care of. Well, they certainly were taken care of, I guess that's one promise, Campbell kept.

    ReplyDelete

Courteous and relevant comments are welcome. Please use a consistent screen name so other readers can connect your contributions.