Monday, June 14, 2010

Strange wording indeed

Another blogger makes an interesting analysis, asking about odd wording employed by Gordon Campbell when speaking on CKNW about HST.

Perhaps, Campbell's non-denial denial style arises from the Premier participating in too many prep sessions prior to Chief of Staff Martyn Brown testifying at the BCR corruption trial. This is part of his review of a Good staged play:
Gordon Campbell said some very interesting things today, one statement from the Habitual Liar really stood out, Campbell said...

"There isn`t one shred of evidence that we were planning on bringing in the HST before the election. . ."

Who would phrase it that way? Only a guilty lying Premier would phrase it that way, Mr. Campbell, is that what we have to do, do we have to find the SHREDDED EVIDENCE first before you admit you were planning it all along?
Recommend this post

7 comments:

  1. Thanks for the plug Mr. Farrell.....

    Something is going on at Naikun ....

    Paul Taylor, president and CEO is leaving as of June 15th...

    The board has voted in a new head man, but where is Paul Taylor going to next, Finivera, BC Hydro, Plutonic?

    The Naikun wind project is dead!


    http://cxa.marketwatch.com/TSX/en/Market/article.aspx?guid=http%3a%2f%2fsystem.marketwatch.com%2fnewscloud%2fdocguid%2f{773CCA52-6228-409D-9674-54344F928B42}&symb=NKW

    ReplyDelete
  2. We should hope the Haida send these promoters back to the city. Now this First Nation must resist oil tanker traffic that will put their southern region at risk if the Enbridge Northern Gateway port & pipeline proceed. One major spill, when it happens (not if), could change a way of life that has depended on these lands and waters for thousands of years.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Or from the horse's mouth itself:

    http://www.naikun.ca/news_media/news.php?id=106

    ReplyDelete
  4. NaiKun Wind will incur a one-time charge of approximately $665,000 arising from the buy-out of Mr. Taylor’s employment agreement.

    Imagine how much he would earn if he were successful? Think about Wall Street where the experts needed endless bail-outs to continue operations. Despite needing all that public money, Wall Street executives shared bonuses of $17.4 Billion in 2008 and $20.3 Billion in 2009.

    Nothing better to motivate than a bonus scheme that rewards success and failure too.

    In business today, insiders make the rules and they win on every flip of the coin, heads and tails.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Gary E. has a news release out about Fish Lake too. How Bad is the Record?

    ReplyDelete
  6. When you can't get anywhere with the horses ass, you have to go to the horses mouth, and even that is suspect. Dumping toxic waste into Fish Lake, will kill every fish, bird, and animal that uses that lake. The First Nations people have to hunt in and fish in that area, for their food. The poison, will leach into the eco system. Flooding the Peace Country, which has the richest farm land in Canada, to give Arnold S. from California, the hydro. With the warning of a global food shortage, what kind of a fool destroys, valuable farm country? There is still oil collecting on the rocks, from the Valdez spill 21 years ago. And Campbell wants to bring in dirty oil tankers. Worse, they want to drill off shore gas and oil wells. When that spill happens, our Orca and Humpback whales, and all marine life, in the spills path will perish, our beautiful BC coast will be gone. The First Nation People, have to rely on hunting and fishing, to feed their wives and children, the salmon are dying out. What in the hell are they supposed to do for food? I sign any of their petitions I can find. We should all be supporting those people right up to the hilt. The air in Prince George, was knowingly poisoned, and children especially were getting sick. I don't know if that has been remedied or not. Wind farms, are you kidding? We are forced into using fossil fuels. The spill in the Gulf, makes me ill. That will be the disaster of the century.

    ReplyDelete
  7. No one has built an offshore wind plant in BC or even Canada. Naikun will be staggeringly expensive. We will have to import the know-how and the special vessels. Nice in theory, but only attractive to the venture capital types who want to hype it up.

    ReplyDelete

COMMENTING

This is an archive only of items published before April 22, 2016. These and newer articles are available at:

https://in-sights.ca/

If you read an article at this blogger site, you can comment on it at the new site.

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.